Self portrait - EtG 2014

Self portrait - EtG 2014

18.09.14

dynamicafrica:

Dynamic Africa Global Events Listing: Arts.

Calling all lovers of African and Afro-diasporan art! Here are some of the current and upcoming art exhibitions on our radar happening all over the world!

Pangaea - “New Art From Africa and Latin America” at Saatchi Gallery, London.
2 April - 2 November.

Several highly renowned artists from Africa exhibit work alongside artists from Latin America. See works from the likes of Leonce Raphael Agbodjelou, Ibrahim Mahama, Mario Macilau, Vincent Michea and Boris Nzebo.

Zander Blom - “New Paintings” at Stevenson, Cape Town.
28 August - 4 October 2014.

Pretoria-born artist Zander Blom will be unveiling his latest work at the STEVENSON gallery in Cape Town. The exhibition opens on Thursday, August 28th from 6pm-8pm. Blom will give an exclusive walkabout of the exhibition on Friday, August 29th at 11am, at a cost of R20.

Pieter Hugo - “Kin” at Fundacio Colectania, Barcelona.
18 September - 10 December.

South African photographer Pieter Hugo will be exhibiting a selection of his work at the Fundacio Colectania in Barcelona, Spain, beginning on September 18th through to early December.

Zanele Muholi solo shows at the EinsteinHaus in Ulm, Germany
18 September - 25 October

See selections of South African photographer Zanele Muholi’s work that documents, investigates and explores the lives of black lesbians in South Africa.

"Artists Committed? Maybe" at Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisbon.
21 June - 7 September.

Works from 21 different artists including Athi-Patra Ruga (South Africa), Bouchra Khalili (France/Morocco), Bruno Boudjelal (France/Algeria), Celestino Mudaulane (Mozambique), Conrad Botes (South Africa), Paul Edmunds (South Africa), Simon Gush (South Africa) and Wim Botha (South Africa).

"Revolution! Works from the Black Arts Movement" at the Brooklyn Museum, New York.
Long-term installation.

See a display of seven works by seven different artists who were part of the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and 1970s in the United States.

Yinka Shonibare - “Egg Fight” at Centre d’Art de la Fondation Blachère, Apt.
23 May - 20 September.

Fondation Blachère is presenting a solo exhibition and new light installation by Yinka Shonibare MBE RA. The exhibition takes its cue from Shonibare’s installation Egg Fight (2009) recently acquired by Fondation Blachère.

Inspired by Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver Travels, the piece is a satirical staging of the divisions between Protestants and Catholics through the argument over which end of a boiled egg should be broken, the large or small end. This work reflects Shonibare’s interest in addressing conflicting ideologies observed in culture, politics and society.

Exhibition Openings: Chris van Eeden, Sidy Diallo, Emma Nourse and Zina Saro-Wiwa at Brundyn+, Cape Town
4 September - 25 October

The following four concurrent exhibitions will be opening at Cape Town’s Brundyn+ starting September 4th:

Chris van Eeden - ‘Open’
Sidy Diallo - ‘Points et Itinéraires’
Emma Nourse -‘Pause’
Zina Saro-Wiwa -‘Phyllis’

EXHIBITIONS OPENING THURSDAY, 4 September 2014 6-9pm

Charles Gaines - “Gridwork 1974-1989” at Studio Museum Harlem, New York
17 July - October 26

An exhibition that features over 70 pieces of Charles Gaines’ early work in conceptualism from a career spanning over 40 years.

Gaines’ early experiments looked at the roles that systems and rule-based procedures play in the construction of forms, objects and meaning.

Nick Cave - “Made for Whites by Whites & Rescue” at Jack Shainman Gallery, New York
4 September - 11 October

Informed by the racist memorabilia he encountered at flea markets and other second-hand shops whilst traveling through the United States, “Made for White by Whites” looks at these once commonplace racially charged objects and the place (and space) the occupy in the American consciousness.

"Rescue", the second part of Cave’s two-part double venue exhibition at the Jack Shainman Gallery, is composed of a series of “sculptures that incorporate found ceramic dogs sitting on furniture within elaborate grottos or dreamlike dens. Dogs have historically been associated with loyalty, class, breed, commitment, and protection. More recently, the term “dawg” has played a role in hip-hop culture as a moniker for brotherhood, respect, and power.”

Chris Ofili - “Night & Day” at New Museum, New York
29 October 2014 - 1 February 2015

The New Museum presents the first ever major solo exhibition of Afro-British artist Chris Ofili. The exhibition will span the Ofili’s career, from his work in painting and drawing, to sculpture, film and poetry.

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06.09.14
300
I-676 Overpass - PHLY

I-676 Overpass - PHLY

04.09.14
tedikuma:

Another comic I started last night. This one is basically about what it was like being African American in high school, minus the supernatural transformation at the end.


Haha

tedikuma:

Another comic I started last night. This one is basically about what it was like being African American in high school, minus the supernatural transformation at the end.

Haha

(Source: theodore3.com, via blackourstory)

04.09.14
Aramingo & Lehigh - PHLY

Aramingo & Lehigh - PHLY

04.09.14
socimages:

The average white American’s social network is 1% black.
By Lisa Wade, PhD
American divisions over the state of our country’s race relations were brought to the forefront in the aftermath of Mike Brown’s shooting by a Ferguson, MO police officer named Darren Wilson. Black Americans are more than twice as likely as whites or Hispanics to say that the killing was part of a broader pattern (source).  And blacks are twice as likely as whites to say that race played an important role in Wilson’s decision to shoot (source).
At The Atlantic, Robert Jones argues that these disparate opinions may be caused, in part, by the different life experiences of the typical white and black American. He shows data, from the American Values Survey, indicating that black people are much more likely than whites to report living in communities rife with problems, from a lack of jobs and inadequate school funding to crime and racial tension.
In the meantime, whites may be genuinely naive about what it’s like to be black in America because many of them don’t know any black people.  According to the survey, the average white American’s social network is only 1% black.  Three-quarters of white Americans haven’t had a meaningful conversation with a single non-white person in the last six months.  In contrast, the social network of the average black American is 65% black and, among Hispanic Americans, 46% Hispanic.
The average white person’s failure to engage meaningfully with people of color isn’t solely a matter of personal choice, though that is certainly part of it.  Nor is it simply a function of the country being majority white, non-Hispanic (but not for long).  White insularity is caused, too, by occupational and residential segregation which, in turn, is the result of both individual choices and institutionalized mechanisms that keep black people in poverty and prison.
If we want the people of America to embrace justice, we must make our institutions just.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

socimages:

The average white American’s social network is 1% black.

By Lisa Wade, PhD

American divisions over the state of our country’s race relations were brought to the forefront in the aftermath of Mike Brown’s shooting by a Ferguson, MO police officer named Darren Wilson. Black Americans are more than twice as likely as whites or Hispanics to say that the killing was part of a broader pattern (source).  And blacks are twice as likely as whites to say that race played an important role in Wilson’s decision to shoot (source).

At The Atlantic, Robert Jones argues that these disparate opinions may be caused, in part, by the different life experiences of the typical white and black American. He shows data, from the American Values Survey, indicating that black people are much more likely than whites to report living in communities rife with problems, from a lack of jobs and inadequate school funding to crime and racial tension.

In the meantime, whites may be genuinely naive about what it’s like to be black in America because many of them don’t know any black people.  According to the survey, the average white American’s social network is only 1% black.  Three-quarters of white Americans haven’t had a meaningful conversation with a single non-white person in the last six months.  In contrast, the social network of the average black American is 65% black and, among Hispanic Americans, 46% Hispanic.

The average white person’s failure to engage meaningfully with people of color isn’t solely a matter of personal choice, though that is certainly part of it.  Nor is it simply a function of the country being majority white, non-Hispanic (but not for long).  White insularity is caused, too, by occupational and residential segregation which, in turn, is the result of both individual choices and institutionalized mechanisms that keep black people in poverty and prison.

If we want the people of America to embrace justice, we must make our institutions just.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

04.09.14
424
12th & Wood - PHLY

12th & Wood - PHLY

03.09.14
11th & Arch - PHLY

11th & Arch - PHLY

03.09.14
Yoga sketch
- EtG 2014

Yoga sketch
- EtG 2014

03.09.14
Yoga sketch 
-EtG 2014

Yoga sketch
-EtG 2014

03.09.14